Chisette Michele and PCOS

 

Four years ago Chrisette Michele, singer, reality star and newlywed was diagnosed with PCOS. Trying to improve her overall health she had become a newly raw vegan but the suffering was so great that she had to have one of her ovaries removed and when she saw her holistic doctor, she was told that she should NO LONGER remain vegan but incorporate meat into her diet.

“My cramps were so bad every month that sometimes – this happened twice within a couple years’ span – I had to be rushed off of an airplane or an airplane had to land to rush me to the hospital because I was in that much pain,” she recalled. “So after some time I decided there’s no way this is normal. And so, so many of my sisters – by ‘sisters’ I just mean girls in the struggle – were like, ‘You know what? That happens to me,’ and I was like, ‘You know what? I’m going to talk to my doctor about this.

It was the scariest thing that ever happened to me…It was overwhelming,” she shared. “I wanted to let other people know because I kind of wanted people to know that they weren’t by themselves. And, I wanted to see who else was in this struggle with me.”

So much of her identity was tied into being vegan that it was tough for her to make the switch.

“I didn’t want to tell PETA because I had just sat down with PETA and we were so excited. I wouldn’t tell the record label because a part of me was vegan. A part of Chrisette Michele is the natural hair and the vegan,” she confessed.

Original links: Blackdoctor.orgMadamnoire.com/

Reminder:
PCOS is the principal androgen-excess disorder, and affects between 5% and 10% of all women. A main underlying problem with PCOS is a hormonal imbalance. In women with PCOS, the ovaries make more androgens than normal. Androgens are male hormones that females also make. High levels of these hormones affect the development and release of eggs during ovulation.


Signs and symptoms of Androgen Excess include: Infertility. Irregular ovulation or menstrual periods, hair growth on the face, chest.

Read more on womenshealth.gov

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